Thou Shalt Give up Bacon, Tasty, Tasty Bacon…

When it comes to food people get weird. It’s not what they do eat, it’s what they don’t eat. Think about it. Despite famines, despite high food prices, despite all the amazing eating opportunities on offer, people across the world have steadfastly refused to eat:

  • pigs
  • cows
  • rabbits
  • root vegetables
  • mushrooms
  • lettuce
  • fish
  • horses
  • insects
  • cats
  • alcohol
  • dogs
  • satay goat testicles
  • whales
  • hot beverages
  • uncooked food
  • guinea pigs
  • mice
  • pumpkins
  • beans
  • camels
  • garlic
  • your grandparents.

That’s just to name  a few.

Each of these foods has been proclaimed wonderful, or at least mouth-worthy, by one culture, and condemned as pig-swill and sin by another. How can we have such wildly different opinions about what counts as good food?

Here’s a few reasons why:

A) We Have No Imagination

Functional fixedness. A cat is a pet. A rat is a pest. A cow goes well with pasta. What it does is what it does is what it does.

That’s what it does.

A horse is a horse is a… tasty meal in France. But in England it’s just… no… you can’t… it’s a horse. You ride them. Horses. Riding. Don’t you get it? You don’t… no! Damn Frogs.

B) Philosophy and Religion

An environmentalist’s refusal to eat endangered sea turtles is easy to understand. Likewise a do-no-harm Jain’s refusal to eat animals, and your daughter’s refusal to eat her pet rabbit. And cannibalism is… do I really need to explain that one?

Other prohibitions get a bit stranger.  Believers in reincarnation might go vegetarian out of fear of eating grandpa in goat form.  Believers in animal spirits may only feed their children small animals, until the child’s spirit is strong enough to deal with eating bigger animal spirits. And believers in controlling one’s uncontrollable passions often dislike garlic because… garlic gets ya going?

When it comes to religious food taboos Judaism is head of the table. God said “Thou shalt not boil a kid in it’s mother’s milk.” and that was that. What can you do? It’s one of the Ten Commandments. (The other ten. Yes, there’s others.) No one’s clear why God said this. He just did. So Jews have been keeping their milk and meat kosher ever since. (P.S. ‘Kid’ here refers to a baby goat. Boiling children in mummy’s breast milk falls under that “Thou shalt not kill” bit. Just so we are clear.)

C) I Don’t Eat Garlic. Who Do You Think I Am?

What is it with garlic? Forget politics. You want a divisive issue, take a whiff of garlic. Go to the right time and place and “Garlic Eater” is a racial slur.

Food is community. Nothing sets you apart more than refusing to eat what others are eating. Nothing binds you together more than eating something no other group will eat. We are what we eat.

D) Power Games

Imagine if you could convince half the population that only you and people like you can safely eat chocolate. Wouldn’t that be great! All the chocolate for me!

Seems people have had this kind of idea before. Especially men. All the meat for me! And then, if they can, the rest of the group swings back around and slaps another taboo on you. Yes, you may get the chocolate and sausages, but we get the bananas and fish fingers! Ha! Social divisions end up getting written in food. Thus the elderly, chiefs, widows, children, and more end up with their own special taboos and rights of violation.

E) Conservation

Don’t eat the milk cow. You get milk from it. Seems sensible. Likewise, if each neighboring village has a different taboo for hunting a different forest animal then the chances of everyone driving these different creatures extinct is diminished.

F) Blame the Grim Reaper

Food can kill you. New food is suspicious. Is that really edible? Are the garlic eaters trying to poison us? They said it was the brown mushroom, right? That looks brown to me.

In the game of evolution, one bad experiment and you lose.

Our food taboo paranoia reaches a high point with pregnancy. Don’t eat fish. Do eat fish. Only eat rats if your husband done the butchering. And no hen’s eggs. You don’t want the baby to be too chicken to come out.

~

Us humans never do anything straightforwardly. Nothing could be more animalistically basic than food. Yet we can’t stop ourselves from squirting identity politics and religious dogma straight into the middle of your lunchtime sandwich. It’s enough to make you want to go get a plate full of bacon and horsemeat, garnished with extra garlic, gluten, and plus-sized animal-spirits, just to spite them. Mmm, yum!

~

Deeper Down the Rabbit-hole:

Food Taboos: their origin and purpose. Victor Benno Meyer-Rochow (2009) Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. Here.

© Under Obvious, 2017.

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Why do Rich People Dress Poor?

Why do well-to-do people wear ripped jeans?

And why do they buy their jeans pre-ripped?

Wouldn’t they rather look rich, than get stopped and frisked? Humans desire status. Wealth is a sign of status. So why dress poor if you don’t have to?

Welcome to Poverty Chic: where popular fashion adopts the symbols of poverty.

It makes no sense.

If you are like me then you’re probably thinking this is just a rare, weird, sub-cultural thing. Desperate fashion designers looking for ideas. Those stupid pre-faded jean shorts. End of story.

Prepare to be surprised.

Poverty Chic is everywhere.

Poverty Chic goes well beyond  clothing.  Redecorating? Rehabilitate old furniture with “shabby chic”. Guys? Try tending that beard for the rural working man “Lumbersexual” look. Going on holiday? Try a sightseeing slum tour, available now in all the world’s best slums.

Culture is littered with the ghosts of Poverty Chic past. History was into it just like us. French Queen Marie Antoinette even built herself an entire rustic village where she could play at being a shepherdess. French aristocrats liked pretending to be French peasants, back before they got executed by French peasants.

Poverty Chic has even gotten into our language. “Pimp” has become a word for over-the-top decoration. A real pimp manages prostitutes.

Any symbol of poverty that you can think of has become Poverty Chic somewhere, somehow, at sometime. Race, religion, drugs, homelessness, mental illness, even the emotions. It’s all there.

Why on earth do we do this?

We can see a touch of mockery here. It has parallels in Blackface, dressing up like Indians, and putting on a Chinese accent to make a racist joke. Stereotypes and play. Strangely, dressing like poor people denies the reality of poverty.  Suffering is reduced to a set of symbols that can be adopted and discarded at whim. The play makes it unreal. And that is half the key to understanding Poverty Chic.

Fear.

We are afraid of becoming poor. But if you can control what you fear, you feel safe. Poverty Chic is control. It’s like the difference between falling off a bridge and bungee jumping. Poverty is your plaything. You are rich enough to be poor. But only if you want to.

You are in control.

You have nothing to fear. The horrifying beast of poverty is boxed, wrapped, and yours for $99.95. Enjoy.

Poverty Chic is visibly different from poor. The Chic version is clean, temporary, and partial. Safe. Not quite real. Torn jeans above expensive shoes. An aftertaste of mockery lingers in the mouth. I do by choice what they do by force. Status. Control. However, as soon as the beast bites back the fashion flees. The “Heroin Chic” look soon vanished when its main photographer died of a heroin overdose.

Poverty Chic also has another side. Poverty is romantic. Poverty looks more real. More authentic. More simple. The monk in a cave. The starving artist. The Blue’s player, all true soul.

Poor people are cool.

Part of us wants to be them. Just like part of us wants to be a cowboy, a noble savage, a shepherdess. We want to escape. They seem to have something we don’t. In the past you might have fed this appetite by going on a pilgrimage, or joining a monastery. Today you can go shopping.

Youth in particular seem to feel this pull. The disillusionment. The angst. The escape from a culture which seems so fake. Poor musicians often lead the way. They’re standing on the outside. They’ve got that feeling too. Grunge. Hip Hop. Rap.

Soon the style goes mainstream. The symbols of poverty become associated with celebrities. The money machine takes over. A new Poverty Chic is born. The style comes to represent everything that people were fleeing from in the first place. Culture gains another Chic ghost. The cycle begins anew.

Fear and escape, then conformity and forgetting, and the search for a new fad. Poverty will always be fashionable. That is, unless you’re poor.

Further Down the Rabbit-hole:

The cases of Poverty Chic are too many to list. Here’s a few to wet your poverty hungry appetite…

Read about Poverty Chic as a way of managing upper-class fear in “Poor Chic: The Rational Consumption of Poverty”, by Karen Bettez Halnon. Here.

© Under Obvious, 2017.